SFiFF53: The Scene

Random bits and pieces of SFiFF53:

Most films are at the Sundance Kabuki, where 5 screens are utilized.
House #1, has a balcony where one may enjoy food and adult beverages; it seats about 600. The other four houses seat about 200 each.

Let’s say we have tickets to ALAMAR at 6:45pm. A line forms outside on the sidewalk about an hour before the film begins. I would show up a little after six and Carol would join me, coming directly from school about 6:15. Our line would go in about 20 minutes before the show.

The Rush Line. If all tickets are sold for ALAMAR, its not “sold out,” it “goes to RUSH” and a Rush Line is formed. Once all ticketholders are seated, the staff fills no-show seats from the Rush Line. First come, first served, cash only.

Really big shows (Opening Night, Closing Night and certain Tributes) are at the Historic Castro Theater (1400 seats).

Before the Robert Duval Tribute, we had a bowl of chowder here on Castro Street. It’s a lot like the Swan Oyster Depot on Polk, but a bit classier, and larger, with a row of tables. Good stuff. Yum.

For Roger Ebert’s Tribute, the line stretched around the block.
On weekends, films are additionally shown at the Clay, seating about 400.

But most films are at Sundance Kabuki. Seated and waiting while the rush people are seated, the screen is filled with a silent slide show of sponsor ads, teasers for upcoming events and visuals made for the Festival. Here’s what it looks like, kinda sorta:

This is the only ad I saw fit to photograph. Sorry about the shaky camera.
Tee shirt that the nearly 300 volunteers wear.

It’s been white in the past. I really love this color.

fin

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