Pigroast, 2010

Last year an actual pig was actually roasted. Pig ca. 2009

The Hales, as I know them, are centered in Lancaster, Ohio and like as not they celebrate their Haleness annually at a reunion wrapped around a Pigroast at Alan’s farm, Hale Hollow. A pig wasn’t actually roasted this year, but as a celebration – and it was a celebration – Pigroast is such a better name than picnic.

Picnic: A basket brought to a field somewhere, maybe under a tree… booooorrrrring. Pigroast: A rollicking good time by a bunch of folks churning around farm-like terrain. Flames and smoke are involved.

Pigs made a contribution by way of two of the meats of choice – keilbasa and pork tenderloin: “the other meat” in this case was brisket, and all were expertly smoked over the preceding 24 hours by Alan with an assist from Eric and Tillie.

This year was special. In addition to filling up on pig parts and other goodies, we were celebrating the life of Edward E. (Bus) Hale, the patriarch of the family who died in March. A service was held at Grace Church where scores of friends and family gathered to pay their respect. Son Mark spoke a tribute called “Dad” and grandson Brian read “Ode to Bus.”

For me, the highlight of the celebration was all those folks mingling in the church lobby before and after the service.

Carol, Barb, Mom and Carolyn Rose

Carolyn Rose shows Jannie and Mom pictures of kids in the olden days.

For more pictures of the service, click here.

And so, we were off to the Pigroast. The main order of business was consuming all that food. Aside from Alan’s smoked meats, there were Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs and folks had brought three kinds of potato salad – including my Mom’s German potato salad, recreated by my sister Amy – green bean salad, vegetable salad, tossed salad, macaroni salad, two kinds of baked beans, fruit salad, deviled eggs and more corn-on-the-cob than Hales have relatives. Desserts included a bundt cake, cherry pie, Jannie’s blackberry pie (all that was left when I got there: juice), cupcakes and cookies.

Eric and Tom guard the meat.
Traci and Nathan guard the food.
The desserts are guarded by… nobody. Uh oh…
Ready, set… EAT.

The day was milder than preceding days – thank the Lord – but still, hot enough. I helped myself to a slice of brisket and a slice of pork and laid them across a squishy bun and slathered on the barbeque sauce. I took slices of kielbasa – silver dollar size – along with green bean salad, potato salad and German potato salad. All great! I was getting full and ready to quit by the time I got to the squishy bun with Alan’s smoked meats. Oh… I’ll just take a bite of this pork that’s sticking out of the bun. OH MY GOD… SO good and SO tender… I cast caution aside and ate the whole sandwich. Now for some fruit salad to calm the tummy; AND I’ve gotta have an ear of corn slathered with melted butter – mouthpopping fresh and wonderful. WOW.

During and after the food, everybody visited one another and Jannie organized groups for pictures, an annual delight.

Photographers and spectators abound.
Mom and her children.
The grandchildren – in strict order of birth date – oldest on the right.
The great grandchildren – in strict order of birth date – oldest on the left in this case.

And finally, since this is the Rector website,

The Carol contingent.

More talk with those and them and soon enough, we were collecting Mom to go back to the compound… errr… Primrose. DeeDee and Ed followed us with the walker, as well as Brian and Natasza, who stayed at Primrose to shoot the breeze and hang out with Liz.

Meanwhile, Carol and her mother went into the annual counting routine – WHO WAS THERE? – Liz reciting names and Carol making a list. Let’s see, 58 family plus others makes 65… a few more than last year.

For more pictures, click here.

Advertisement

3 thoughts on “Pigroast, 2010

  1. This came by email from sister Amy, she doesn’t do computer stuff and rarely emails:
    Subject: Thank You!
    Greetings! I am actually sending an e-mail . We just looked at the pig roast pictures and loved your comments, Marc. The pics were great, too. I’ll tell you all that “food-talk” made my appetite soar! Marc, you’re the king of food description and enjoyment. Carol, your family is so warm and easy to talk to. It was like turning back the clock–way back! One more thing before I go. I can’t describe how truly wonderful it was spending time with you guys. Always special to me. Your boys and their lovely wives are incredible folks-nubbins and all! Love and hugs, Amy. XOXOXOXOXOXO.

    Like

  2. Dad–
    I raved so much about Gary’s rendition of the German Potato Salad to Alison that now she wants us to make it with our latest crop of potatoes. Therefore you *HAVE* to do an EatsForOne feature on the recipe, especially if you can track down Martha’s version (Gary might be able to help you there, a good excuse to give them a call).
    –ER

    Like

  3. OK…
    I’m on the case.
    Talked to Amy and Gary, here’s how it went.

    Eric’s on me to write something about “Mom’s” German Potato Salad you guy’s brought to the Pigroast. Can you give me the recipe?

    Gary says, “Gosh, I just started… Amy peeled the potatoes and I sliced them… we were just cooking together…

    I don’t remember the proportions… I know we started with a lot of bacon… 1 1/2 pounds, and a lot of onions… saute the onions until they’re good and caramelized… deglaze the pan with a bit of water, then start adding vinegar and sugar until it tastes like the German Potato Salad in German Village, Columbus. I’ve never seen the recipe written down. Maybe next time, I can make some notes.”

    So I’ll try and make it.
    You try and make it, and we can compare notes.

    Like

Leave a Reply to bookmarc Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.